Current Alcohol Screening and Brief Intervention Practices among Canadian Midwives

 

Rose A. Schmidt, MPH, Kyla Kaminsky, MA, Courtney R. Green, PhD, and Jocelynn L. Cook, PhD, MBA

 

ABSTRACT

Alcohol use during pregnancy is associated with multiple adverse health outcomes for the woman and fetus, including stillbirth, miscarriage, low birth weight, and risk of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Midwives are uniquely situated to routinely engage in conversations about alcohol use with women that are strength based, health promoting, and focused on empowerment. This report is a secondary analysis of the midwifery responses (n = 196) from a larger data set of health care providers collected by the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) in an online survey in October and November 2017. The aim of the survey was to identify current knowledge, attitudes, practices, and beliefs among Canadian health care providers on screening, brief intervention, and referral (SBIR) for women’s alcohol use. Most midwives (97%) ask women about alcohol use during pregnancy; however, only about half practice brief intervention (57%). Perceived confidence in conducting brief intervention was positively associated with its practice (t [193] = 5.31, p < .0001). Improving skills and confidence to provide brief support about alcohol use during pregnancy using evidence-informed approaches will strengthen this practice in Canada.

KEYWORDS

alcohol consumption, alcohol-exposed pregnancies, brief intervention, fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, midwifery, SBIR

 

This article has been peer reviewed.

 

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